Expert Picks: Paris Restaurants We Can’t Wait to Support After Quarantine

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Expert Picks: Paris Restaurants We Can’t Wait to Support After Quarantine
Paris is not Paris without its cafés and restaurants. Part of the city’s social fabric, these venues don’t just offer memorable cuisine, but also an opportunity to people watch, laugh with friends over a cup of coffee or glass of wine, and partake in Parisian life. Needless to say, we’re counting down the days until the capital’s restaurants can open again after the Covid-19 crisis. As the lockdown is lifted, social distancing measures are still in place and the official date has not been announced– most likely in June. When restaurants finally do reopen, we will rush to support our beloved hang-outs which desperately need our support in this time of economic crisis. We asked our expert contributors: Where will you eat first? Which restaurant are you most eagerly anticipating? Here are some of their recommendations. Any favorites that we missed? Share in the comments section below. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Pizza_clip20 (@pizza_clip20) on May 6, 2020 at 4:10am PDT Chez Lillo “The first restaurant I’ll visit in Paris after the lockdown is lifted is a neighborhood favorite: Chez Lillo in the 20th arrondissement. This family-owned restaurant serves up Sicilian-style pizzas, pasta, and antipasti. Hungry locals are greeted by Lillo or his charming daughter, and on Friday nights, the kid-friendly restaurant is packed with boisterous eaters or those waiting for their carry-out orders.” — Allison Zinder is a professional chef, market tour guide, and writer. O’Coffee Shop “I dream of a flat white from O’Coffee Shop in the 15th. They have the best pastries, an interesting mix of European and Down Under recipes as the lovely co-owners, Tim and Matt, hail from France and Australia, and their coffee is one of the best in Paris, true to the barista culture Matt brought with him when he moved to Europe. Their lunch menu packs a punch too, but their greatest asset is the big smile they welcome you with, whether you are a regular or it’s your first time.” —Sarah Bartesaghi Truong is the founder of VeniVidiParis and a frequent contributor to Bonjour Paris. View this post on Instagram
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Lead photo credit : Strawberry raspberry tart, Quinsou. Photo: Dawn Dailey

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BP's expert editorial team includes some of the city's top English-language journalists.

Comments

  • Libby
    2020-06-04 19:03:30
    Libby
    You MUST have a French teaching section in here. Describing the views and the restaurants, menus etc etc. One parisian talking slowly is very good

    REPLY

  • Libby
    2020-06-04 19:03:30
    Libby
    You MUST have a French teaching section in here. Describing the views and the restaurants, menus etc etc. One parisian talking slowly is very good

    REPLY

  • Martino
    2020-05-25 17:11:25
    Martino
    First, let me congratulate Bonjour Paris for assembling such a wonderful list of places to try. My hat is off to the whole team! I can hardy wait. I must, however step in right away to comment on a comment by Mr. Cobleigh. As one who proudly possesses the recessive gene that bestows the full benefits and responsibilities of having red hair, I am always delighted when another great soul is claimed for the tribe, but alas, I don't think Monsieur Franklin was one of us. According to the Franklin Institute and many other sources, he had blond hair as an outdoorsy youth, which graded into light brown as an adult. He had grey eyes, also not often associated with red hair. Furthermore, in an effort to blend in and curry favor with the French court, he did wear a powdered wig on his first visit to Paris in 1767, as shown in an oil portrait from that same year by David Martin. Later, Franklin realized that the backwoods look appealed to French audiences who had been primed by Daniel Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe" (1719) to admire plucky survivors, and began sporting a big beaver fur hat and homespun clothing on subsequent trips. Many years later, another anti-colonialist adopted the very same tactic, also against England, when Mohandas Gandhi chucked the three-piece suits and polished shoes he'd worn as a London lawyer and began wearing a homespun loincloth, shawl, and dhoti. Neither Franklin nor Gandhi were the least bit "untamed" but both knew how to play that card to great advantage. Now for some chocolate . . .

    REPLY

  • Martino
    2020-05-25 17:11:25
    Martino
    First, let me congratulate Bonjour Paris for assembling such a wonderful list of places to try. My hat is off to the whole team! I can hardy wait. I must, however step in right away to comment on a comment by Mr. Cobleigh. As one who proudly possesses the recessive gene that bestows the full benefits and responsibilities of having red hair, I am always delighted when another great soul is claimed for the tribe, but alas, I don't think Monsieur Franklin was one of us. According to the Franklin Institute and many other sources, he had blond hair as an outdoorsy youth, which graded into light brown as an adult. He had grey eyes, also not often associated with red hair. Furthermore, in an effort to blend in and curry favor with the French court, he did wear a powdered wig on his first visit to Paris in 1767, as shown in an oil portrait from that same year by David Martin. Later, Franklin realized that the backwoods look appealed to French audiences who had been primed by Daniel Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe" (1719) to admire plucky survivors, and began sporting a big beaver fur hat and homespun clothing on subsequent trips. Many years later, another anti-colonialist adopted the very same tactic, also against England, when Mohandas Gandhi chucked the three-piece suits and polished shoes he'd worn as a London lawyer and began wearing a homespun loincloth, shawl, and dhoti. Neither Franklin nor Gandhi were the least bit "untamed" but both knew how to play that card to great advantage. Now for some chocolate . . .

    REPLY

  • Ed Cobleigh
    2020-05-23 13:49:29
    Ed Cobleigh
    Ms Brack, The US Ambassador to France, Benjamin Franklin was indeed a francophile. However, he was not a "big-wig." Franklin was famous for not wearing a wig in a time when most men did for formal occasions. He let his natural red hair be his calling card in Paris and was know as a untamed export from the USA.

    REPLY

  • Ed Cobleigh
    2020-05-23 13:49:29
    Ed Cobleigh
    Ms Brack, The US Ambassador to France, Benjamin Franklin was indeed a francophile. However, he was not a "big-wig." Franklin was famous for not wearing a wig in a time when most men did for formal occasions. He let his natural red hair be his calling card in Paris and was know as a untamed export from the USA.

    REPLY

  • Monique
    2020-05-22 11:36:38
    Monique
    Some I know & some new ones to try when we arrive in September. In these articles, it would be so lovely to have the address/phone #. Merci

    REPLY

  • Monique
    2020-05-22 11:36:38
    Monique
    Some I know & some new ones to try when we arrive in September. In these articles, it would be so lovely to have the address/phone #. Merci

    REPLY