10 Confusing French Words & Expressions for English Speakers

10 Confusing French Words & Expressions for English Speakers

3917
1
Print Print
Email Email

Photo: French à La Carte

A great number of words of French origin have entered the English language just as many Latin words have come to the English language. While 45 percent of English words are of French origin, many of them no longer retain the same meaning they had in French, and most are pronounced differently in the two languages. These false cognates, faux amis, can be tricky for learners of either language.

Let’s explore the most common “false friends” and the mistakes English speakers predictably make when using them.

1 Supporter (F) versus to Support ( E )

Photo: French à La Carte

In French
The verb supporter in French means to bear, to stand « Il ne supporte pas le bruit. » He can’t stand noise.

In English
To support means to help, to give moral help.
« Il la soutient dans ce moment difficile » meaning “He supports her in this difficult moment or for a sport team.
« Il soutient l’équipe de Manchester. » He supports the Manchester team.

Frequent mistake: « Je supporte le club du Real Madrid »
What you should say: « Je soutiens l’équipe l’équipe du Real Madrid »

 

2 Monnaie (F) and Money (E)

Photo: French à La Carte

In French
La monnaie means currency or coins. « Désolée, je n’ai pas de monnaie. » « Sorry, I have no loose change. » You could easily have no monnaie, but plenty of money.

In English
Money in English is translated by argent in French. « Il a beaucoup d’argent. » « He has a lot of money. »

Frequent mistake : « Il est pauvre et n’a pas beaucoup de monnaie. »
What you should say : « Il est pauvre et n’a pas beaucoup d’argent. »

3 Sensible (F) versus Sensitive (E)

In French
Sensible is used in French in the sense of being sensitive to something. « Mes yeux sont sensibles à la lumière » meaning « My eyes are very sensitive to the light. » Or it’s employed to describe being emotionally sensitive. « C’est une personne très sensible. » « She is someone who’s very sensitive ». Information can also be sensible in French. « Les données sensibles sont protégées » which means in English « Sensitive data is protected. »

In English
Sensitive means sensible in French. Just like in French, the word can be used to describe a person, a body part, or information. In addition, it can also be used for someone who is touchy, over sensitive. In that case, in French the word is susceptible. « Claire est une personne très susceptible. » « Claire is an over sensitive person. »

Frequent mistake: « Jane est très sensible, elle déteste être critiquée. »
What you should say: « Jane est très susceptible, elle déteste être critiquée. »

4 Eventuellement (F) versus Eventually (E)

In French
Eventuellement means possibly, potentially. It indicates a possibility with no certitude. « Je peux éventuellement vous proposer une alternative si c’est cette solution ne vous convient pas. » « I can eventually offer you an alternative if this solution is not convenient for you. »

In English
Eventually is used in the sense of in the end, especially after a long delay, dispute, or series of problems. « After three hours of delay, the plane eventually took off. » « Après un délai de tois heures l’avion a finalement décollé. »

Common mistake « Ils ont marché pendant 3 heures sur des rochers et ils sont éventuellement retrouvé leur chemin. »
What you should say « Ils ont marché pendant 3 heures sur les rochers et ils ont finalement retrouvé leur chemin. »

5 Confus (F) / Confused ( E)

Photo: French à La Carte

In French
The adjective confus is used for something unclear, confused or vague. « Ses explications sont confuses. » « Her explanations are unclear. »
When it is used relating to a person, it is a very formal and old-fashioned way to say that someone is embarrassed. « Je suis confus d’être arrivé très en retard » which means in English « I am terribly sorry to be so late. »

In English
To confuse means to mix up someone’s mind or ideas, or to make something difficult to understand. We frequently hear « I am confused » which is commonly literally translated into French by « Je suis confus(e) ». Unfortunately it is wrong. It could be translated into French two different ways. « Je suis embrouillé(e ) » or more common « Ce n’est pas clair pour moi ». And regarding the expression « It’s confusing » it could be translated into French by « Ca porte à confusion » or « Ce n’est pas très clair ».

Common mistake : « La réunion est finalement prévue à 3h ou à 5h ? je suis confus( e). »
What you should say « La réunion est finalement prévue à 3h ou à 5h ? ce n’est pas clair pour moi. »

6 Librairie (F) Library (E)

Photo: French à La Carte

In French
This is another, often confused faux ami. There is a book connection, but une librairie is where you go to buy a book, not to borrow one. It means a bookshop or newsstand.

In English
If you go to a library, une bibliothèque or these days, at the médiathèque, it’s a place where you will either study or borrow a book.

Common mistake : « Cet après-midi je vais étudier à la librairie. »
What you should say : « Cet après-midi, je vais étudier à la bibliothèque. »

7 Actuellement (F) versus Actually (E)

In French
Actuellement means currently in English, now, at the present time. « Tim est actuellement à New York pour 6 mois » means « Tim is currently in New York for 6 months. »

In English
Actually can be translated as “in fact,” to indicate that a situation exists or happened, or to emphasize that something is not true. « He says that his father is American, in fact it’s wrong. » « Il dit que son père est Américain, en fait c’est fau.x »

Frequent mistake « Elle dit qu’elle habite en France, actuellement ce n’est pas vrai ».
What you should say « Elle dit qu’elle habite en France, en fait ce n’est pas vrai »

8 Occupé(e) (F) and Busy (E)

Photo: French à La Carte

In French
This one is not a faux ami but rather a word which is used improperly due to its literal translation into French. Occupé(e) is used for someone who has a lot to do. « Je suis très occupée. » « I am very busy ». Although a person can be “busy” in French, a busy moment or place can’t be translated by the word occupé. To stick to the meaning you could use chargé for a schedule or fréquenté for a place.

In English
The word busy can be interchangeably used for a moment, a place and a person. « I am very busy. » « Je suis très occupé. » « The metro line is very busy. » « La ligne de métro est très chargée. » « The two last days have been very busy. » « Les deux derniers jours ont été très chargés. »

Common mistake : « J’ai deux journées très occupés. »
What you should say : « J’ai deux journées très chargées. »

9 Envie ( F ) versus to Envy

In French
The verb envier can be tricky as it can be used in the sense of to envy something or someone but combined with the verb avoir envie de, it means to wish or to desire something. You could say « J’ai envie d’une glace » meaning « I feel like an ice cream » or « Je n’ai pas envie d’aller au cinéma ce soir » meaning « I don’t feel like going to the cinéma tonight. »

In English
The noun envy can mean desire like in French but can also be linked to jealousy. « For men it is difficult to face lust, envy and avarice » meaning « Il est difficile pour les hommes de résister à la luxure, la gourmandise et la jalousie. »

Frequente mistake : « Elle veut tout ce que possède les autres, elle est tourmentée par l’envie. »
What you should say : « Elle veut tout ce que possède les autres, elle est tourmentée par la jalousie. »

10 Excité ( F) and Excited ( E)

Photo: French à La Carte

In French
Excité(e) can be used in the sense of being thrilled, just like in English, however there is a second meaning with a sexual connotation. To be excited can also mean to be aroused. Just to avoid any raised eyebrows, it’s recommended to make sure to specify what it is exactly that you are so enthusiastic about.

In English
Excited simply means to be feel very happy or enthusiastic and there is no second meaning as in French.

Common mistake:
« Partir trois jours dans la jungle m’excite beaucoup. »
What you should say:
« Je suis très enthousiaste à l’idée de partir trois jours dans la jungle. »

Want more content like this?

Sign up to the free Bonjour Paris newsletter to get all the best Paris related content and competitions sent directly to your inbox. Find out more.

1 COMMENT

  1. I greatly enjoyed your article! As a long-time student of francais these are helpful to know. (I am a VERY slow learner.)
    I would like to suggest, however, that when you visit the USA, be careful how you use the word “excited.” As in french, there may be a second meaning which could raise more than an eyebrow.

LEAVE A REPLY