Trouver un Jules à Paris

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What is Paris without romance?  Enchanted gardens, walks, candlelit bistros, narrow cobblestone streets and breathtaking views are much better enjoyed à deux, IMHO.  But hanging out in Irish pubs, Anglo-bars and EasyInternet Café will not get you closer to French citizenship.  This will require an insider’s advice, something written by an insider who knows Paris and is not afraid to reveal her secrets.… Likening itself to advice from infamous single women of other cities à la Bridget, Carrie and Ally, Valérie Appert’s guide The Single Woman’s Guide to Life in Paris: Trouver un Jules à Paris  touts itself as “advice from friends, sly addresses and a plan of attack for finding love on the corner of the street.” The guide is part of the “Paris is for us,” “Paris est à nous” series, other titles of which include romantic walks, best make-out spots, best food markets, cafés, where to play music and advice for young mothers in Paris. This book neatly and light-heartedly lays out several tactics for finding a Jules, a lover or husband, in the city, with witness accounts of proven methods. From an outsider’s point of view, meeting people is difficult because, most often, Parisians rarely leave the intimate circle of friends that they have been cultivating since birth.  Many people of the city have rarely left, attending elementary, middle, high school and college under their parents’ roofs.  There is no on-campus co-habitation, close-quarter living with other co-eds, or separation from mommy and daddy for that matter.  This is what makes Parisians an interesting challenge: integrating into a group of friends or meeting a long-term love takes time. This is not to say, however, that all residents of Paris are Parisians, per se.  Many come from other parts of the country, while ex-pats from other European or American countries add to the fabric of the capital; so even if you do not break through to a Paris native, there are many other eligibles who are looking to enjoy ‘une aventure’, as they say in French.  The trick, however, is finding them. Some not-so-bad ideas of Appert: Free consultation with a Galeries Lafayette Personal Stylist (01 42 82 35 50), by appointment.  The French School of Seduction (www.ecoledeseduction.com.)  For men and women, courses in psychology, body language and role-playing: men prove their powers of the approach on passers-by and women at a videotaped mock-candelit dinner.  Courses range from a personality diagnosis to a 9-month itinerary.  Galas and balls open to the public: Trap a ‘Polytechnique’ engineering student, the most prestigious school at the ‘Point Gamma,’ where 5,000-6,000 students gather the last Saturday in May (01 69 33 40 50 for info) Wine tastings at Tchin Tchin one Saturday a month from 4 to 9pm; sign up to receive the client mailing detailing the date. (9, rue Montorgueil, 01 42 33 07 77) Dance Classes at La Coupole: Tuesday Salsa nights led by New Yorker Susan Sparks, 22.50 Euros gets you instructions, a drink and an evening of dancing. (01 43 20 14 20) And a slew of bar and club listings for hunting alone, à deux, or in a swarm. Also, restaurants with communal tables for elbow-to-elbow dining Where to Get It:Trouver un Jules à Paris, Parigramme, 5.34 Euros. Found at all Fnac and other major booksellers.
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