Paris-Born Chemist Jean-Pierre Sauvage Wins Nobel Prize

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Paris-Born Chemist Jean-Pierre Sauvage Wins Nobel Prize


What would you do if you won a Nobel Prize?

Jean-Pierre Sauvage opened a bottle of champagne – a timeless, respectable way to celebrate an achievement or milestone (or, frankly, just a Saturday). Sauvage had ample cause for celebration, as he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry on Wednesday, October 5, 2016.

Jean-Pierre Sauvage

Jean-Pierre Sauvage

Speaking with radio station France Info on Wednesday after the news was announced, Sauvage sounded elated, and noted how he chose to celebrate by uncorking champagne.

As the news spread, French media outlets pumped out celebratory headlines on Wednesday:

Le Monde:Le prix Nobel de chimie attribué à Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J. Fraser Stoddart et Bernard L. Feringa

Le Figaro: “Un Français parmi les lauréats du prix Nobel de chimie

Paris Match: “Le Prix Nobel de chimie décerné à un Français et deux autres chimistes

The best headline came from Libération:

Nobel de chimie: «Imaginez, de minuscules robots dans nos veines»…” (“Imagine, tiny robots in our veins…”)

Crystal structure of a catenane reported by Sauvage and coworkers in the Chem. Commun., 1985/ Wikipedia

Crystal structure of a catenane reported by Sauvage and coworkers in the Chem. Commun., 1985/ Wikipedia

Sauvage is a coordination chemist, and he works at Université de Strasbourg as an emeritus professor. His speciality is supramolecular chemistry.

Paris-born Sauvage received his Ph.D. from Université Louis-Pasteur, where he made significant contributions to the syntheses of cryptand ligands. In 1997, he was named a member of the esteemed French Academy of Sciences, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV.

The French chemist shares the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with two others: Sir James Fraser Stoddart (from Edinburgh, UK) and Bernard L. Feringa (from Groningen, Netherlands). The trio was awarded the prize for “the design and synthesis of molecular machines,” said the Nobel Prize committee, which is comprised of five people chosen by the Norwegian Parliament.

The prize money, 8 million Swedish kronor (€830,781), will be split among the three.

Sauvage can drink bottles of Dom Pérignon for years to come.

The Nobel Prize

The Nobel Prize

Lead photo credit : The Nobel Prize

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Anne McCarthy is a contributing writer to BBC News, Teen Vogue, The Telegraph, Dance Magazine, and more. She has a Masters in Creative Writing from the University of Westminster and is the Editor in Chief of Fat Tire Tours’ travel blog. She lives in New York City.

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Comments

  • suedoise
    2016-10-13 10:21:33
    suedoise
    Never speak of the Nobel prize as something won. Noone wins this prize, it is attributed. And never define someone so nobly attributed as a Nobel winner. The word is laureate. Please.

    REPLY

  • suedoise
    2016-10-13 10:21:18
    suedoise
    Never speak of the Nobel prize as something won. Nonne wins this prize, it is attributed. And never define someone so nobly attributed as a Nobel winner. The word is laureate. Please.

    REPLY