Women Who Shaped Paris

Women Who Shaped Paris

For fifty years Parisian cultural life centered on the writer Sidonie Gabrielle Colette. Known simply as Colette, her name was one of the most famous in France. At her death in 1954, Colette’s fame was...

At the heart of many of Édouard Manet’s paintings is a ginger-haired woman that, although not identical from picture to picture, turns out to be the same model. The nudes in the French painter’s...

First in a New Series about Famous Americans Who Lived and Died in Paris Innumerable American writers, artists and poets made Paris their home for months, even years at a time. (To name a few: Hemingway,...

In May 1924, Zelda, Scott and their daughter Scottie decamped from America to Paris. The extravagance of their lifestyle in the U.S. in the previous four years had left the Fitzgeralds in debt both...

  Le Jardin du Luxembourg in the heart of Paris is a pure delight any time of the year and is the second largest park in Paris. A thick forest surrounds the back of the...

French explorer, author, and Buddhist scholar, Alexandra David-Néel led a full and exceptional life. In 1924, at the age of 55, she was the first European woman to cross the Trans-Himalayas in the dead...

In Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast, where many of his erstwhile Parisian compatriots were subjected to often exorable criticisms, Sylvia Beach remained unscathed. Hemingway wrote, "No-one that I ever knew was nicer to me." George Whitman, a...
Coco Chanel on the balcony at the Ritz/ courtesy of Ritz Paris

Hotels were made for affairs. And where better to conduct an affair than in the inimitable, iconic surroundings of The Ritz Hotel in Paris? This was especially true through the febrile, uncertain times of the Second...

Gertrude Stein was perhaps the most famous of all the American women to make their home in Paris. Stein lived there from 1903 until her death in 1946. Her salon in 27, Rue de Fleurus...

The second installment in a series about famous Americans who lived and died in Paris. Everyone knows how Isadora Duncan died. Her long silk scarf, caught up in the wheels of a speeding, open topped Amilcar...

"I have been to hell and back, and let me tell you, it was wonderful." Louise Bourgeois's quote perfectly captures her droll insightfulness about the vicissitudes of life. She considered her artwork, which spanned most...
Mata Hari in 1910

"I am a woman who enjoys herself very much,” Mata Hari wrote from her cell, "sometimes I lose, sometimes I win” No other female spy has aroused as much curiosity as Mata Hari. Involved in...